Killing animals: national industry, national loss.

drought-420x0

While meat consumption has increased greatly in Australia, the number of meat producers has significantly reduced.
People now eat ten times more chicken than in 1960, but the number of chicken farms in Australia has plummeted and two corporations now produce the majority of poultry in Australia.
(Baiada Poultry Pty Limited and Inghams EnterprisesPty Limited have a combined market share of 69% See IBISWorld 2011, Industry Report C2112 Poultry Processing in Australia, p. 4}

Between 1970 and 2002 the number of pig producers in Australia declined by 94%, while total pig meat production grew by 130%.
(Productivity Commission 2005, Australian Pigmeat Industry, Report no. 35, Melbourne, p 9.)

Who pays the price of this monopoly?

All of us, animals and humans.

Here are 10 facts:

1) The pressure put on animals to grow quicker and produce more meat, milk and eggs results in frequent health problems for the animals and consequently for the humans.

2) An estimated 124,910 new cases of cancer will be diagnosed in Australia this year, with that number set to rise to 150,000 by 2020. 1 in 2 Australian men and 1 in 3 Australian women will be diagnosed with cancer by the age of 85. Cancer is a leading cause of death in Australia – cancer accounted for about 3 in 10 deaths in Australia. The most common cancers in Australia (excluding non-melanoma skin cancer) are prostate, colorectal (bowel), breast, melanoma and lung cancer. Prostate, bowel and breast cancer have been linked to consumption of animal food by several studies.
Cancer costs more than $3.8 billion in direct health system costs (7.2%).

3) Foodborne illness isn’t the only health threat from factory farms. Overuse of antibiotics can fuel the growth of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, the use of arsenic and growth hormones can increase the risk of cancer in people, and crowded conditions can be a breeding ground for disease. When thousands of beef cattle are packed into feedlots full of manure, bacteria can get on their hides and then into the slaughterhouses. Contamination on even one steer can contaminate thousands of pounds of meat inside a slaughterhouse.

4) In the financial year 2009/2010, there were 355 workers’ compensation claims in Victoria’s meat industry that required at least 10 days off work, or cost more than $580 in treatment, or both – almost one a day. Nationally the industry’s injury and illness rate remains twice as high as that in the construction industry, and four times the average of all workplaces.”

5) Abattoir workers are more prone to violence (women have higher level of aggression than men,) according to recent studies.
People who work in abattoirs are more likely to be desensitized to suffering, which in turn could make them more likely to be violent towards humans, a research published in the Society and Animals journal found.

6) The grain harvest fluctuates from year to year, but on average, animals consume about one-third of it. Of this amount, beef cattle consume 21%, similar to the amount eaten by broiler chickens. This is shown in the report published by the Stock Feed Manufacturers’ Council. In fact, it’s not too difficult to demonstrate that animals consume more wheat than all of Australia’s population.

7) To have so much of Australia’s fertile arable land devoted to feeding animals is an incredible waste of agricultural resources. There is more than enough arable land to feed the population with plant foods, with plenty left over for export.

8) Even in Australia, the demand for animal feed is so high that we have to import over half a million tonnes of additional soybean per year. We produce enough soybean to meet a strong local demand in the human food supply, such as tofu and flour products.

9) Tens of thousands of animals generate millions of tons of manure annually, which pollutes water and air and can have health repercussions on neighbors and nearby communities.

10) Many factory farm operators are not benefiting from this system of production because they are not getting paid much.
The tiny handful of companies that dominate each livestock sector exert tremendous control over the prices farmers receive, and they micromanage the day-to-day operations of many farms.

read more at: http://canberravegan.blogspot.com.au/2013/09/eatology-forum-pseudo-science-of.html

www.veganeasy.org
www.vegankit.com

Consumers and Predators

fox with flower

In animal science, “consumers” are those organisms of an ecological food chain that receive energy by consuming other organisms.
“Consumers” have important roles to play within an ecosystem such as balancing the food chain by keeping animal populations at a reasonable number by predation, for example.

In that sense, humans are not “consumers” or “predators” because they don’t keep animal populations at a reasonable number: they make them proliferate instead and destroy the planet.
Raising animals for food damages the environment more than just about anything else that we do. Whether it’s the overuse of resources, global warming, massive water or air pollution, or soil erosion, raising animals for food is wreaking havoc on the Earth.

The Cows are Killing the Reef.

Great-Barrier-Reef

The Cows are Killing the Reef.

Get the facts:

– 80 percent of the land adjacent to the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area supports agricultural production, primarily beef cattle grazing and intensive cropping agriculture.

– Beef cattle grazing is the largest single land use with approximately 4,500,000 cattle grazing in the Great Barrier Reef Catchment (Department of Primary Industries & Fisheries 1993). Grazing land management has resulted in extensive clearance of vegetation and with over-stocking, particularly during drought conditions has caused widespread soil erosion and the export of eroded material, with its associated nutrients, into the Great Barrier Reef World Heritage Area.

– The principal consequence for the Great Barrier Reef from the introduction of beef grazing on catchment lands stems from increased soil erosion.

(source: Great Barrier Reef Marine Park Authority)

– What’s killing the reef is (in order of importance):
Fine silt (the major coral killer), over 75% of which comes from grazing lands
Nitrogen pollution, mostly particulate, from sediment erosion of grazing lands
Phosphorous pollution, mostly particulate, from sediment erosion of grazing lands

– …the reef used to be amazing, but the report card [from the Queensland Government’s Reef Water Quality Protection Plan Secretariat] released in July 2013 has now downgraded the health of the Great Barrier Reef to “poor”. 72% of the reef’s hard coral has died since the 1960′s…”

(source: The World Preservation Foundation)

read more: http://www.vivalavegan.net/community/articles/839-are-cows-killing-the-reef.html

Torture has never been a health food.

1004pigs

The consequences of stress and injuries in animals make their flesh difficult to use or it cannot be used at all by butchers or meat processors and is even wasted in extreme cases (of course if the factory follows the regulations…)
In general, people don’t know what they really eat: a mixture of bacteria and acidity.
From birth to slaughter the body of the animal will accumulate toxins and diseases that are only waiting to be passed on to the human body.

Why does this happen?
Animals need sugars (glycogen) for the energy required by muscle activity. In normal conditions, the glycogen in the muscles is transformed into lactic acid after death. Lactic acid is necessary to delay the growth of bacteria. The bacteria cause spoilage of the ‘meat’ (off-smells, color changes, rancidity and slime) and decrease the shelf life of meat. If the contaminating bacteria are those of the food poisoning type, they become a source of disease in humans.

So what happens in a stressed animal?
in times of stress and anxiety animals use their storage of glycogen. Therefore, after death their carcass will have a very small quantity of it and as a consequence only a small quantity of lactic acid. The lack of lactic acid will cause not only a pronounced acidity, but also the proliferation of bacteria and the meat can’t be sold to butchers or meat processors.

An example: Pale Soft Exudative (PSE) meat.
PSE in pigs is caused by severe, short-term stress prior to slaughter, for example during off-loading, handling, holding in pens and stunning. All this may result in biochemical processes in the muscle in particular in rapid breakdown of muscle glycogen and the meat becoming very pale with pronounced acidity (pH values of 5.4-5.6 immediately after slaughter).

The atrocity of transport and slaughter ends up in the meat.
Many facilities kill pigs by electrocution only the head, which is considered potentially “reversible” if the animal is not bled completely within 15 seconds. Many of the pigs in these facilities regain consciousness at some point in the bleeding process.

An alternative to electrocution is the use of a captive bolt pistol. A pointed bolt penetrates the brain causing the animal to spasm uncontrollably, and then collapse. The pig is then hung by a chain or cable, and cut from the neck to the abdomen. Again, many pigs regain consciousness during the bleeding process.

Once bleeding is complete, the pig’s body is dropped into a tank of scalding water to loosen the course hairs. A conveyer periodically turns the carcass as it passes through the tank. The killing line moves so quickly that some of the pigs are still conscious when they are dumped into the scalding tank.

Many of the pigs die before reaching the slaughterhouse due to either extreme weather or porcine stress syndrome (PSS)-a neuromuscular disorder that is triggered by physical and/or mental stress.

Why do right-wing adherents engage in more animal exploitation and meat consumption?

Planet of the Apes 1

Why do right-wing adherents engage in more animal exploitation and meat consumption?

“Despite the well-documented implications of right-wing ideological dispositions for human intergroup relations, surprisingly little is understood about the implications for human–animal relations.

We investigate why right-wing ideologies – social dominance orientation (SDO) and right-wing authoritarianism (RWA) – positively predict attitudes toward animal exploitation and meat consumption.

Two survey studies conducted in heterogeneous community samples (Study 1, N = 260; Study 2, N = 489) demonstrated that right-wing ideologies predict greater acceptance of animal exploitation and more meat consumption through two explaining mechanisms:
(a) perceived threat from non-exploitive ideologies to the dominant carnist ideology (for both SDO and RWA)
(b) belief in human superiority over animals (for SDO).

These findings hold after controlling for hedonistic pleasure from eating meat.
Right-wing adherents do not simply consume more animals because they enjoy the taste of meat, but because doing so supports dominance ideologies and resistance to cultural change. Psychological parallels between human intergroup relations and human–animal relations are considered.”

from: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0191886914000944

Honey, you’re killing me.

Featured image

Bees work themselves to death producing honey. And they are killed by honey trade. They are small slaves with wings.


– Honey taken from hives is replaced with sugar syrup. Since it is not the proper equivalent of their natural diet, their immune system is weakened so that bees are exposed to several diseases and their lifespan is shortened. For this reason, often several antibiotics are added to the syrup (tetracycline, terramicina, etc.).

– Beekeepers always like to point out that honeybees pollinate the agricultural crops we eat. Without beekeepers, they claim, we would not be able to eat a long list of fruits and vegetables. The whole question of pollination is nothing more than an attempt to divert attention away from the fact that they are exploiting animals and that honey is the product of animal exploitation.
It is not as though foregoing honey will bring about an end to commercial pollination, so it is not clear what exactly the beekeepers’ point is. Commercial honey production and commercial pollination are not the same – the bees that produce honey are not the ones doing commercial pollination. Independent surveys suggest that honeybees are the dominant pollinators for only 15% of the world’s crops. Honeybees are not necessarily the best pollinators in natural ecosystems. Bees wet the pollen with saliva making it less likely to be transferred to a plant. They also travel to many different types of plants so the pollen doesn’t necessarily get to the right plant Also, not all crops require insect pollination.

– When beekeepers tell you they are helping the honeybees out by transporting them to nectar flows, they are facilitating the honey hoarding instinct of the honeybees – much to the detriment of other more important pollinators.
Bees may compete with pollinators, potential ‘keystone’ species. As the name implies, keystone species are ones that the ecosystem probably cannot do without. There is ample evidence for the fact that honeybees crowd out not only other bee pollinators, but also birds, honey possums and other insects. In addition to the threat from the honeybees, native pollinators (that are much more efficient than them) are in decline due to habitat destruction and fragmentation, chemical farming, monocropping and insecticides, all of which only exacerbate the competition with honeybees.

– A successor queen is selected by a human instead of the reigning queen – both of whom may have been “artificially inseminated. Queens can live for as long as five years but most commercial beekeepers replace them every two years. “Replace” is a euphemism for killing the old queen. Backyard beekeepers also regularly kill their queens. This is done for numerous reasons that all boil down to exerting control over the hive. For example, it is done to prevent swarming, aggression, mite infestation, and to keep honey production at a maximum. Queens come from commercial queen suppliers.

– Often the queen bee is inseminated artificially (a method that requires the male’s death; the most common method to obtain semen consists in the beheading of the male, when the head is detached, the central nervous system receives an electrical impulse, which causes sexual arousal; sometimes, the head and chest of the male are crushed to cause the release of his endophallus, the male genitalia).
see more:
Drone sperm collecting
https://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DiVjLkUVt-Lg&h=0AQGBDIsd

Insemination for queen bees
https://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3D3vPV_WeQxV8&h=VAQHHzfXc

– There is often a lack of regard for the bees’ lives. In the US, 10 to 20 percent of colonies are lost over the winter. It is partly by accident and partly on purpose. Some beekeepers kill off their hives before winter. This practice can make economic sense.

– In the process of checking up on the hive and taking the honey, some bees get squashed by the frames or stepped on. Bees who sting the keeper in defense of their home necessarily die. If two colonies are combined, the queen of the weaker colony is killed. So that the honey can be easily removed from the comb, it is often warmed prior to removal. “Bees brought into the warming room with the supers will fly to a window where they can be trapped to the outside by a wire cone or bee escape. If there are no windows in the room other methods such as an electric grid can be used to dispose of the stray bees”

– The most important reason why the bees can’t just fly away is because the beekeepers won’t let them; beekeepers do their best to prevent swarming. Not only would they lose half of their bees, but a lot of preparation goes into swarming during which time the bees do not produce honey. If part of a colony tries to move to say, a nice hollow tree, they are captured and forced back into their human-made box. Since swarming requires a queen, the queen’s wings are often clipped beekeeper clipping queen’s wings so that she cannot join in the swarm. Additionally, if beekeepers find (or are told) that there is a swarm in the area, they will often go out and capture it.

– A beekeeper may tell you that they are helping the bees because in the wild, colonies swarm and then both the old and new colonies may die because they are small and ill-prepared for winter. But that is only half the story. Almost all feral colonies swarm in the spring. Then, at the end of the summer, 40% of the new colonies swarm again. It is these colonies that are unlikely to survive. Despite this, there is still a 60% increase in the number of colonies. This is an issue. A lot of free animals die over winter – it keeps the population in check. Should we start keeping deer because some of them die over the winter?

Read more: http://vegetus.org/honey/honey.htm.

please read/share

– Honey taken from hives is replaced with sugar syrup. Since it is not the proper equivalent of their natural diet, their immune system is weakened so that bees are exposed to several diseases and their lifespan is shortened. For this reason, often several antibiotics are added to the syrup (tetracycline, terramicina, etc.).

– Beekeepers always like to point out that honeybees pollinate the agricultural crops we eat. Without beekeepers, they claim, we would not be able to eat a long list of fruits and vegetables. The whole question of pollination is nothing more than an attempt to divert attention away from the fact that they are exploiting animals and that honey is the product of animal exploitation.
It is not as though foregoing honey will bring about an end to commercial pollination, so it is not clear what exactly the beekeepers’ point is. Commercial honey production and commercial pollination are not the same – the bees that produce honey are not the ones doing commercial pollination. Independent surveys suggest that honeybees are the dominant pollinators for only 15% of the world’s crops. Honeybees are not necessarily the best pollinators in natural ecosystems. Bees wet the pollen with saliva making it less likely to be transferred to a plant. They also travel to many different types of plants so the pollen doesn’t necessarily get to the right plant Also, not all crops require insect pollination.

– When beekeepers tell you they are helping the honeybees out by transporting them to nectar flows, they are facilitating the honey hoarding instinct of the honeybees – much to the detriment of other more important pollinators.
Bees may compete with pollinators, potential ‘keystone’ species. As the name implies, keystone species are ones that the ecosystem probably cannot do without. There is ample evidence for the fact that honeybees crowd out not only other bee pollinators, but also birds, honey possums and other insects. In addition to the threat from the honeybees, native pollinators (that are much more efficient than them) are in decline due to habitat destruction and fragmentation, chemical farming, monocropping and insecticides, all of which only exacerbate the competition with honeybees.

– A successor queen is selected by a human instead of the reigning queen – both of whom may have been “artificially inseminated. Queens can live for as long as five years but most commercial beekeepers replace them every two years. “Replace” is a euphemism for killing the old queen. Backyard beekeepers also regularly kill their queens. This is done for numerous reasons that all boil down to exerting control over the hive. For example, it is done to prevent swarming, aggression, mite infestation, and to keep honey production at a maximum. Queens come from commercial queen suppliers.

– Often the queen bee is inseminated artificially (a method that requires the male’s death; the most common method to obtain semen consists in the beheading of the male, when the head is detached, the central nervous system receives an electrical impulse, which causes sexual arousal; sometimes, the head and chest of the male are crushed to cause the release of his endophallus, the male genitalia).
see more:
Drone sperm collecting
https://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DiVjLkUVt-Lg&h=0AQGBDIsd

Insemination for queen bees
https://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3D3vPV_WeQxV8&h=VAQHHzfXc

– There is often a lack of regard for the bees’ lives. In the US, 10 to 20 percent of colonies are lost over the winter. It is partly by accident and partly on purpose. Some beekeepers kill off their hives before winter. This practice can make economic sense.

– In the process of checking up on the hive and taking the honey, some bees get squashed by the frames or stepped on. Bees who sting the keeper in defense of their home necessarily die. If two colonies are combined, the queen of the weaker colony is killed. So that the honey can be easily removed from the comb, it is often warmed prior to removal. “Bees brought into the warming room with the supers will fly to a window where they can be trapped to the outside by a wire cone or bee escape. If there are no windows in the room other methods such as an electric grid can be used to dispose of the stray bees”

– The most important reason why the bees can’t just fly away is because the beekeepers won’t let them; beekeepers do their best to prevent swarming. Not only would they lose half of their bees, but a lot of preparation goes into swarming during which time the bees do not produce honey. If part of a colony tries to move to say, a nice hollow tree, they are captured and forced back into their human-made box. Since swarming requires a queen, the queen’s wings are often clipped beekeeper clipping queen’s wings so that she cannot join in the swarm. Additionally, if beekeepers find (or are told) that there is a swarm in the area, they will often go out and capture it.

– A beekeeper may tell you that they are helping the bees because in the wild, colonies swarm and then both the old and new colonies may die because they are small and ill-prepared for winter. But that is only half the story. Almost all feral colonies swarm in the spring. Then, at the end of the summer, 40% of the new colonies swarm again. It is these colonies that are unlikely to survive. Despite this, there is still a 60% increase in the number of colonies. This is an issue. A lot of free animals die over winter – it keeps the population in check. Should we start keeping deer because some of them die over the winter?

Read more: http://vegetus.org/honey/honey.htm

Do we value a child’s life (if he/she were dying) over a rabbit? If we valued true science over the scientific fraud of animal testing, the child and the rabbit would both be safe.

Featured image

1) The heart-lung machine was the most critical development in open-heart surgery for it takes over the function of the patient’s heart and lungs during open heart operations. John H. Gibbon of Philadelphia, U.S.A. who developed a heart-lung machine on dogs abandoned his project when two patients died, admitting that it was unsafe for human beings.
J.W. Kirklin of the Mayo Clinic, without the use of animals and using careful clinical trials made a heart-lung machine which was successful on human beings.
(H. McLeave, The Risk Takers, Holt, Rinehard & Winston, 1962, page 70.)

2) ARSL claims that coronary by-pass and open heart surgery was pioneered on dogs in New Zealand, and without “their help” many New Zealanders who received heart surgery would not be here today. Were these claims backed up with evidence which could withstand scrutiny, the N.Z. Anti-Vivisection Society would concede and shift from the scientific to the ethical battleground against vivisection. However not a shred of evidence is offered and a study of the papers written by pioneers in the field of heart surgery (and all medicine) reveals a clear-cut and comprehensive case for the immediate abolition of vivisection on the grounds that it is unreliable, dangerous, and retards progress.
http://www.nzavs.org.nz/

3) “Animal research was NOT responsible for the development of coronary bypass surgery. In 1961 in France, Kunlin first used a portion of a person’s own vein to replace obstructed arterial segments. This gave birth to arterial bypass surgery for different parts of the body, the heart included. By contrast, Beck of Ohio and Vineburg of Canada took their theories to the animal laboratory in search of surgical answer to the complications of coronary artery disease. Each devised more than one procedure, envisioning success from their findings in animals. Not long after, their recommended operations were performed on thousands of human patients. What were the results? To say the least, unworthy. To put it bluntly; a fiasco, a total failure. I am witness to this event and the least I can do is speak out. Animal experimentation inevitably leads to human experimentation. That is the final verdict, sad as it is. And the toll mounts on both sides.”
– Dr Moneim A. Fadali, for 25 years one of America’s leading cardiovascular surgeons.

4) What about all the children who died or were born with birth defects exactly because of the inadequacy of animal testing?

read more:
http://www.vivisectioninformation.com/index.php?p=1_28_Birth-defects-a-consequence-of-animal-testing

http://www.vivisectioninformation.com/index.php?p=1_10_50-disasters-of-animal-testing

http://www.vivisectioninformation.com/index.php?p=1_4_ADVERSE-REACTIONS-humans-injured-by-animal-tests

http://www.vivisectioninformation.com/index.php?p=1_11_HISTORY-AND-HUMAN-ILLNESS-animal-tests-have-failed-patients