Honey, you’re killing me.

Featured image

Bees work themselves to death producing honey. And they are killed by honey trade. They are small slaves with wings.


– Honey taken from hives is replaced with sugar syrup. Since it is not the proper equivalent of their natural diet, their immune system is weakened so that bees are exposed to several diseases and their lifespan is shortened. For this reason, often several antibiotics are added to the syrup (tetracycline, terramicina, etc.).

– Beekeepers always like to point out that honeybees pollinate the agricultural crops we eat. Without beekeepers, they claim, we would not be able to eat a long list of fruits and vegetables. The whole question of pollination is nothing more than an attempt to divert attention away from the fact that they are exploiting animals and that honey is the product of animal exploitation.
It is not as though foregoing honey will bring about an end to commercial pollination, so it is not clear what exactly the beekeepers’ point is. Commercial honey production and commercial pollination are not the same – the bees that produce honey are not the ones doing commercial pollination. Independent surveys suggest that honeybees are the dominant pollinators for only 15% of the world’s crops. Honeybees are not necessarily the best pollinators in natural ecosystems. Bees wet the pollen with saliva making it less likely to be transferred to a plant. They also travel to many different types of plants so the pollen doesn’t necessarily get to the right plant Also, not all crops require insect pollination.

– When beekeepers tell you they are helping the honeybees out by transporting them to nectar flows, they are facilitating the honey hoarding instinct of the honeybees – much to the detriment of other more important pollinators.
Bees may compete with pollinators, potential ‘keystone’ species. As the name implies, keystone species are ones that the ecosystem probably cannot do without. There is ample evidence for the fact that honeybees crowd out not only other bee pollinators, but also birds, honey possums and other insects. In addition to the threat from the honeybees, native pollinators (that are much more efficient than them) are in decline due to habitat destruction and fragmentation, chemical farming, monocropping and insecticides, all of which only exacerbate the competition with honeybees.

– A successor queen is selected by a human instead of the reigning queen – both of whom may have been “artificially inseminated. Queens can live for as long as five years but most commercial beekeepers replace them every two years. “Replace” is a euphemism for killing the old queen. Backyard beekeepers also regularly kill their queens. This is done for numerous reasons that all boil down to exerting control over the hive. For example, it is done to prevent swarming, aggression, mite infestation, and to keep honey production at a maximum. Queens come from commercial queen suppliers.

– Often the queen bee is inseminated artificially (a method that requires the male’s death; the most common method to obtain semen consists in the beheading of the male, when the head is detached, the central nervous system receives an electrical impulse, which causes sexual arousal; sometimes, the head and chest of the male are crushed to cause the release of his endophallus, the male genitalia).
see more:
Drone sperm collecting
https://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DiVjLkUVt-Lg&h=0AQGBDIsd

Insemination for queen bees
https://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3D3vPV_WeQxV8&h=VAQHHzfXc

– There is often a lack of regard for the bees’ lives. In the US, 10 to 20 percent of colonies are lost over the winter. It is partly by accident and partly on purpose. Some beekeepers kill off their hives before winter. This practice can make economic sense.

– In the process of checking up on the hive and taking the honey, some bees get squashed by the frames or stepped on. Bees who sting the keeper in defense of their home necessarily die. If two colonies are combined, the queen of the weaker colony is killed. So that the honey can be easily removed from the comb, it is often warmed prior to removal. “Bees brought into the warming room with the supers will fly to a window where they can be trapped to the outside by a wire cone or bee escape. If there are no windows in the room other methods such as an electric grid can be used to dispose of the stray bees”

– The most important reason why the bees can’t just fly away is because the beekeepers won’t let them; beekeepers do their best to prevent swarming. Not only would they lose half of their bees, but a lot of preparation goes into swarming during which time the bees do not produce honey. If part of a colony tries to move to say, a nice hollow tree, they are captured and forced back into their human-made box. Since swarming requires a queen, the queen’s wings are often clipped beekeeper clipping queen’s wings so that she cannot join in the swarm. Additionally, if beekeepers find (or are told) that there is a swarm in the area, they will often go out and capture it.

– A beekeeper may tell you that they are helping the bees because in the wild, colonies swarm and then both the old and new colonies may die because they are small and ill-prepared for winter. But that is only half the story. Almost all feral colonies swarm in the spring. Then, at the end of the summer, 40% of the new colonies swarm again. It is these colonies that are unlikely to survive. Despite this, there is still a 60% increase in the number of colonies. This is an issue. A lot of free animals die over winter – it keeps the population in check. Should we start keeping deer because some of them die over the winter?

Read more: http://vegetus.org/honey/honey.htm.

please read/share

– Honey taken from hives is replaced with sugar syrup. Since it is not the proper equivalent of their natural diet, their immune system is weakened so that bees are exposed to several diseases and their lifespan is shortened. For this reason, often several antibiotics are added to the syrup (tetracycline, terramicina, etc.).

– Beekeepers always like to point out that honeybees pollinate the agricultural crops we eat. Without beekeepers, they claim, we would not be able to eat a long list of fruits and vegetables. The whole question of pollination is nothing more than an attempt to divert attention away from the fact that they are exploiting animals and that honey is the product of animal exploitation.
It is not as though foregoing honey will bring about an end to commercial pollination, so it is not clear what exactly the beekeepers’ point is. Commercial honey production and commercial pollination are not the same – the bees that produce honey are not the ones doing commercial pollination. Independent surveys suggest that honeybees are the dominant pollinators for only 15% of the world’s crops. Honeybees are not necessarily the best pollinators in natural ecosystems. Bees wet the pollen with saliva making it less likely to be transferred to a plant. They also travel to many different types of plants so the pollen doesn’t necessarily get to the right plant Also, not all crops require insect pollination.

– When beekeepers tell you they are helping the honeybees out by transporting them to nectar flows, they are facilitating the honey hoarding instinct of the honeybees – much to the detriment of other more important pollinators.
Bees may compete with pollinators, potential ‘keystone’ species. As the name implies, keystone species are ones that the ecosystem probably cannot do without. There is ample evidence for the fact that honeybees crowd out not only other bee pollinators, but also birds, honey possums and other insects. In addition to the threat from the honeybees, native pollinators (that are much more efficient than them) are in decline due to habitat destruction and fragmentation, chemical farming, monocropping and insecticides, all of which only exacerbate the competition with honeybees.

– A successor queen is selected by a human instead of the reigning queen – both of whom may have been “artificially inseminated. Queens can live for as long as five years but most commercial beekeepers replace them every two years. “Replace” is a euphemism for killing the old queen. Backyard beekeepers also regularly kill their queens. This is done for numerous reasons that all boil down to exerting control over the hive. For example, it is done to prevent swarming, aggression, mite infestation, and to keep honey production at a maximum. Queens come from commercial queen suppliers.

– Often the queen bee is inseminated artificially (a method that requires the male’s death; the most common method to obtain semen consists in the beheading of the male, when the head is detached, the central nervous system receives an electrical impulse, which causes sexual arousal; sometimes, the head and chest of the male are crushed to cause the release of his endophallus, the male genitalia).
see more:
Drone sperm collecting
https://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DiVjLkUVt-Lg&h=0AQGBDIsd

Insemination for queen bees
https://www.facebook.com/l.php?u=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2Fwatch%3Fv%3D3vPV_WeQxV8&h=VAQHHzfXc

– There is often a lack of regard for the bees’ lives. In the US, 10 to 20 percent of colonies are lost over the winter. It is partly by accident and partly on purpose. Some beekeepers kill off their hives before winter. This practice can make economic sense.

– In the process of checking up on the hive and taking the honey, some bees get squashed by the frames or stepped on. Bees who sting the keeper in defense of their home necessarily die. If two colonies are combined, the queen of the weaker colony is killed. So that the honey can be easily removed from the comb, it is often warmed prior to removal. “Bees brought into the warming room with the supers will fly to a window where they can be trapped to the outside by a wire cone or bee escape. If there are no windows in the room other methods such as an electric grid can be used to dispose of the stray bees”

– The most important reason why the bees can’t just fly away is because the beekeepers won’t let them; beekeepers do their best to prevent swarming. Not only would they lose half of their bees, but a lot of preparation goes into swarming during which time the bees do not produce honey. If part of a colony tries to move to say, a nice hollow tree, they are captured and forced back into their human-made box. Since swarming requires a queen, the queen’s wings are often clipped beekeeper clipping queen’s wings so that she cannot join in the swarm. Additionally, if beekeepers find (or are told) that there is a swarm in the area, they will often go out and capture it.

– A beekeeper may tell you that they are helping the bees because in the wild, colonies swarm and then both the old and new colonies may die because they are small and ill-prepared for winter. But that is only half the story. Almost all feral colonies swarm in the spring. Then, at the end of the summer, 40% of the new colonies swarm again. It is these colonies that are unlikely to survive. Despite this, there is still a 60% increase in the number of colonies. This is an issue. A lot of free animals die over winter – it keeps the population in check. Should we start keeping deer because some of them die over the winter?

Read more: http://vegetus.org/honey/honey.htm

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s